In The News

Softpedia News: Linux Foundation’s Badge Program Launches to Boost Security of Open Source Apps

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Marion Nester of Softpedia covers the basics of CII Best Practices Badges Program.

Dubbed CII Best Practices Badges, the free badge program has been created by Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) project. Its main goal is determining the security, stability, and quality and various open source software projects, and among the first to earn these badges are the well-known Linux kernel, OpenSSL, Node.js, GitLab, cURL, Zephyr, and OpenBlox.

Read more at Softpedia News.

SecurityWeek: No Exit: The Case for Moving Security Information Front and Center

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SecurityWeek has published an article by CII’s Emily Ratliff called No Exit: The Case for Moving Security Information Front and Center.

The top 4 were picked for brevity for this article, but I encourage you to compare the full lists for greater impact. With this in mind, the similarities between the two lists released 13 years apart are startling and humbling.

Read more at SecurityWeek.

SecurityWeek: Establishing Correspondence Between an Application and its Source Code

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SecurityWeek has published an article by CII’s Emily Ratliff called Establishing Correspondence Between an Application and its Source Code.

Soon it will be possible to enroll the signed hashes from the package management system as IMA attributes during the installation process. Then, if you configure your system to be IMA enforcing, you will know that every running application came from your trusted distribution.

If your trusted distribution uses reproducible builds, then you will be able directly trace the chain of integrity of the executing process back to the original code and know that the code has not been subverted during delivery.

Read more at SecurityWeek.

Wired: One Startup’s Heretical Plan to Turn Open Source Code Into Cash

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Klint Finley mentions CII in an article for Wired about the problems monetizing open source development efforts, called One Startup’s Heretical Plan to Turn Open Source Code Into Cash.

Non-profit organizations like the Linux Foundation have stepped in to help fund a growing number of projects in recent years. For example, the Linux Foundation started the Core Infrastructure Initiative to help fund OpenSSL and other crucial but obscure open source projects.

Read more at Wired.